tomasz.cc http://tomasz.cc tomasz.cc Mon, 24 Aug 2015 08:41:25 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Common Resolve and Premiere roundtrip issues http://tomasz.cc/2015/02/common-resolve-and-premiere-roundtrip-issues/ http://tomasz.cc/2015/02/common-resolve-and-premiere-roundtrip-issues/#comments Thu, 26 Feb 2015 17:00:23 +0000 http://tomasz.cc/?p=1583 As an example I’m going to show you my process for editing and grading RAW/MLV files recorded with Canon 5D Mark III: Process MLV files with MLVFS Generate Proxies with DaVinci Resolve (ISSUE #1) Import proxies into Premiere Do the EDIT (ISSUE #2) Export the timeline to XML Import the XML into Resolve, relink the...

The post Common Resolve and Premiere roundtrip issues appeared first on tomasz.cc.

]]>
As an example I’m going to show you my process for editing and grading RAW/MLV files recorded with Canon 5D Mark III:

  1. Process MLV files with MLVFS
  2. Generate Proxies with DaVinci Resolve (ISSUE #1)
  3. Import proxies into Premiere
  4. Do the EDIT (ISSUE #2)
  5. Export the timeline to XML
  6. Import the XML into Resolve, relink the footage to the RAW clips
  7. Do the final grading
  8. Export the graded clip

1. Process MLV files with MLVFS

Download and install MLVFS as an automator workflow as described on the Magic Lantern forums.

Navigate to your MLV files location and right click on the parent directory:

MLVFS context menu
MLVFS context menu

Select MLVFS. New folder selection for the output files will appear – choose empty folder where you want your dng files to be mapped to. Once it’s done a webpage will appear:

MLVFS web interface
MLVFS web interface

Here you have a few options to adjust the MLV conversion settings. I use the settings pictured above.

2. Generate Proxies with DaVinci Resolve

In this step we need to import our dng files into DaVinci Resolve:

Reel name field is empty
Reel name field is empty

Please note that the Reel Name field is empty at this point. This is the first detail in the process that will lead to some unpleasant issues if we don’t fix it.

Issue 1 – Reel/tape names

Reel name in Davinci Resolve and Tape name in Premiere Pro is a metadata information which is used to link the media between the 2 programs.

If we render proxies out of Resovle for editing, they have to contain this information in order to be able to link them with the original RAW files after the editing is done in Premiere.

If this information is not there Resolve won’t be able to match the clips and the Premiere edit won’t be imported back to DaVinci.

Reel names are automatically generated for media files in most cameras automatically (for instance BlackMagic cameras) but the problem appears with Magic Lantern RAW files (.raw, .mlv).

Reel Name fix

To fix the problem we can populate the fields manually but it’s not ideal solution especially if we are dealing with tons of files.

Another way is to tell Resolve to generate Reel Name metadata using file/directory name of the DNG files. To do that we have to go to the project settings and select two options in Master Project Settings / Conform Options:

Populate Reel Name automatically
Populate Reel Name automatically

When we hit apply and close the window the fields are no longer empty:

Reel Name fields are now populated
Reel Name fields are now populated

Now we can proceed to the Proxy export. To do that let’s navigate to the Deliver panel in Resolve and use the settings like these:

Proxy Export
Proxy Export

Please keep in mind that almost all the options in green boxes are essential for the process to work properly (except for the codec).

3. Import Proxies into Premiere Pro

To confirm that our changes in Davinci Resolve worked ok, let’s have a look at the imported clips in Premiere Pro:

Tape Name is not empty
Tape Name is not empty

Find a column Tape Name in the project window and make sure it’s not empty. If we missed the Reel Name generation step in Davinci Resolve before, the Tape Name here in Premiere Pro would be empty now.

4. Do the EDIT in Premiere Pro

There is another danger during the editing for the whole process to fail – Subclips.

Issue 2 – Premiere SubClips

Subclip is a very nice feature in Premiere Pro helping us get organised. It’s part of my editing workflow and I had to learn the hard way that they are not compatible with Resolve Importer (or Premiere Pro XML exporter for Final Cut Pro).

If you try to export your timeline containing subclips, in Resolve you will see your timeline after import and on the first sight it will look ok, but after a closer look you will notice that the IN and OUT points are wrong. All the clips will begin from the very beginning of the clip instead of the selected IN point for the SubClip.

XML Export Subclip Fix

The solution for the subclip xml export is:

  1. Not using SubClips when editing in Premiere Pro
  2. Converting each SubClip to Master Clip before exporting to XML
  3. Using After Effects to open Premiere Pro project file and saving it again out of AE – it doesn’t support subclips so it will convert all the subclips automatically (this will not work with the roundtrip as the reel/tape names are lost during this process)

If you are just exporting the timeline for color correction and grading and there is no need to relink the footage in Resolve you can always render the while timeline and use the splitter in Davinci. This option will work 100% of a time, however requires a bit more work.

To convert a subclip to a normal clip (Master Clip) right click on the subclip and select Edit Subclip:

Edit subclip
Edit subclip

and then check the option Convert to Master Clip:

Convert to Master Clip
Convert to Master Clip

5. Export the timeline to XML

When we make sure there are no subclips in our timeline, we can proceed to the XML export by selecting: File / Export / Final Cut Pro XML…

6. Import the XML into Resolve, relink the footage to the RAW clips

There’s one more detail that we need to be aware of – when we import the XML file back in resolve, we need to make sure the option Automatically import source clips into media pool is unchecked:

Relink to the RAW footage
Relink to the RAW footage

This way Resolve will try to link the clips to the original DNG files. It can do that using the metadata information stored in the files that we previously put there – Reel Name or Tape Name. If we didn’t do that before, now Resolve would complain that it’s not able to relink the footage, and our editing effort would go to waste.

Final steps 7. Do the final grading and 8. Export the graded clip

Now when our timeline is back in Resolve with the original DNG files linked we can go ahead and do the corrections and grading with the best quality footage we have.

More

Want to read more about this or similar topics? Let me know and subscribe to the newsletter to stay up to date!

No spam, I promise!

The post Common Resolve and Premiere roundtrip issues appeared first on tomasz.cc.

]]>
http://tomasz.cc/2015/02/common-resolve-and-premiere-roundtrip-issues/feed/ 2
Discovering processing workflow of DaVinci Resolve http://tomasz.cc/2015/02/discovering-processing-workflow-davinci-resolve/ http://tomasz.cc/2015/02/discovering-processing-workflow-davinci-resolve/#comments Mon, 23 Feb 2015 17:00:23 +0000 http://tomasz.cc/?p=1510 The whole processing workflow of DaVinci Resolve can be simply displayed as the following diagram: The workflow of DaVinci Resolve The workflow is divided into sections that are processed sequentially. Also, some of the sections are between many clips (they are not clip specific). Let’s have a look closely at each of them. Camera RAW...

The post Discovering processing workflow of DaVinci Resolve appeared first on tomasz.cc.

]]>
The whole processing workflow of DaVinci Resolve can be simply displayed as the following diagram:

The workflow of DaVinci Resolve
The workflow of DaVinci Resolve

The workflow is divided into sections that are processed sequentially. Also, some of the sections are between many clips (they are not clip specific). Let’s have a look closely at each of them.

Camera RAW

Camera RAW module is the first in the chain as it has to interpret the RAW data before it can be processed further. This module is visible only when working with RAW footage.

Camera RAW section
Camera RAW section

Sections

DaVinci Resolve features a few processing sections and each of them consists of a set of nodes. Every section affects the image independently but in a specific order:

Available sections of nodes
Available sections of nodes

This means that we can chain many sections, group some of the corrections and build a sophisticated color processing workflow.

Groups

Groups are very useful as they allow us to create a specific set of nodes to achieve a given correction or look. Then it can be applied to any clip at any time.

With groups we can create a set of final looks and then quickly change them for all the clips and see how they work.

Group indicator
Group indicator

DaVinci Resolve shows a small indicator above the clip in the small timeline when the clip belongs to a group.

Each group has two separate processing node chains which are applied before and after the main nodes (in the clip section).

Group assignment
Group assignment

Group Pre-Clip & Post-Clip

When a particular clip is assigned to any group then two additional options apear in the top-right popup menu. Group Pre-Clip nodes will be applied before any corrections in the clip section (the main section of every clip).

Post-Clip nodes will be applied after all the corrections made in the clip section.

Note: Caching doesn’t work on the group level so I don’t recommend using heavy processing in the group nodes as they will most likely sacrifice the performance of the playback.

Clip

This section is the default one for every clip in the COLOR tab. The main clip specific corrections and grading should be there.

Caching works for every single node in the Clip section – any OpenFX plugins that slow down the playback time should be used here.

Timeline

The last section available in the popup menu opens a node panel that affects all the clips and it is applied at the very end. If there’s a correction that we want to apply to all the clips in the same way, we can do it here (for example a little bit of sharpening after the correction and grading is done).

I use it to apply a LUT for the initial primary corrections. When I’m done I move a LUT to the group section in case I will be developeing more sets of looks to be able to qucikly switch between them (also I prefer to put LUT in the beginning of the nodes chain, before all the nodes in the Clip section).

More

Want to read more about this or similar topics? Let me know and subscribe to the newsletter to stay up to date!

No spam, I promise!

The post Discovering processing workflow of DaVinci Resolve appeared first on tomasz.cc.

]]>
http://tomasz.cc/2015/02/discovering-processing-workflow-davinci-resolve/feed/ 1
Winter in Wieliczka, BMPCC footage http://tomasz.cc/2015/02/winter-wieliczka-bmpcc-footage/ http://tomasz.cc/2015/02/winter-wieliczka-bmpcc-footage/#comments Fri, 13 Feb 2015 17:00:22 +0000 http://tomasz.cc/?p=1560 A few weeks ago a real winter finally came. I couldn’t resist and I went for a walk to the nearby park with my Blackmagic Pocket Camera to shoot some clips. Everything was shot on Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera (handheld) with Sigma 18-35 f/1.8 and Canon 24-105 f/4 VR (both with Metabones SpeedBooster). I used...

The post Winter in Wieliczka, BMPCC footage appeared first on tomasz.cc.

]]>
A few weeks ago a real winter finally came. I couldn’t resist and I went for a walk to the nearby park with my Blackmagic Pocket Camera to shoot some clips.

Everything was shot on Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera (handheld) with Sigma 18-35 f/1.8 and Canon 24-105 f/4 VR (both with Metabones SpeedBooster). I used variable ND filter as well not to close the lens too much. Output format was set to RAW.

Graded in DaVinci Resolve with a small touch of FilmConvert.

It was a good weather proof and low temperature test. It was about -5 degrees Celsius, and as soon as the snow hit the camera body and the lens it started to melt, making it a bit wet. No problems whatsoever. The only issue I had was the battery life. They don’t last long in good conditions and I think they were even worse in the low temperature. I didn’t want to drag the battery pack with me so I was replacing internal batteries until I drained all of them (6 total).

Here are a few screenshots from DaVinci Resolve to show how it was color corrected and graded:

The example clip
The example clip
CameraRAW Panel
CameraRAW Panel

First step is to normalize all the clips to the same exposure levels, to set the same contrast and saturation levels. All the initial steps are made in the CameraRAW panel in order to be able to recover any critical information, in case footage was over or underexposed too much.

Group Pre-Clip Nodes
Group Pre-Clip Nodes
Clip Nodes
Clip Nodes
Group Post-Clip Nodes
Group Post-Clip Nodes

All my clips were assigned to one particular group where I made all my common corrections and all the custom grades, contrast and exposure corrections were done in the Clip section for every individual clip.

Noise reduction was applied at the clip level mainly because it’s the heaviest plugin in the whole chain and it drastically slows down the playback. Putting it anywhere but in the Clip section would remove it from the caching process, and I wouldn’t be able to achieve realtime playback. You can read a bit more about caching in resolve in one of my previous articles as well as a few tips how to improve DaVinci Resolve performance.

FilmConvert settings

FilmConvert settings

Group nodes were used to create a look. Pre-Clip contains a Look up table and some minor color corrections, the Post-Clip section sharpens the clip a bit, enhances the greens and prepares the tones for the final plugin which is FilmConvert. Contrast and the color settings of the plugin are very subtle and the grain is set to 45% which adds some detail back after the noise reduction in the darker areas (trees in the shadows).

More

Want to read more about this or similar topics? Let me know and subscribe to the newsletter to stay up to date!

No spam, I promise!

The post Winter in Wieliczka, BMPCC footage appeared first on tomasz.cc.

]]>
http://tomasz.cc/2015/02/winter-wieliczka-bmpcc-footage/feed/ 0
Understanding BMPCC exposure with Zebras http://tomasz.cc/2015/02/understanding-bmpcc-exposure-zebras/ http://tomasz.cc/2015/02/understanding-bmpcc-exposure-zebras/#comments Thu, 05 Feb 2015 21:17:05 +0000 http://tomasz.cc/?p=1490 After thorough testing of the BMPCC (Black Magic Pocket Cinema Camera) I started to notice some specific behaviour of the camera, and just to prove some of my assumptions I decided to run a few additional tests to verify them. Questions that I want to answer in this article: What are Zebras? What is the...

The post Understanding BMPCC exposure with Zebras appeared first on tomasz.cc.

]]>
After thorough testing of the BMPCC (Black Magic Pocket Cinema Camera) I started to notice some specific behaviour of the camera, and just to prove some of my assumptions I decided to run a few additional tests to verify them.

Questions that I want to answer in this article:

  1. What are Zebras?
  2. What is the behaviour of Zebras on BMPCC?
  3. What is the best way to use Zebras on BMPCC to achieve best results?

Zebras

Zebras, or Zebra Patterning is a video camera feature to aid in correct exposure. Areas of the image that are over a certain threshold are covered with a stripped pattern.

Zebras over a clipped area
Zebras over a clipped area

Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera gives us the option of using a range of the threshold settings from 75% to 100% (with 5% step in between).

ISO vs Zebras

The question I had in mind was – is using Zebras at 100% safe in every scenario? Does it protect highlights in RAW, ProRes, at any ISO setting? At any mode (film, video)?

Let’s have a look at series of tests.

Firstly let’s shoot at native ISO 800, and grab 2 clips:

  1. Exposed to the right (ETTR), no clipping
  2. Open the iris one step, to clip the highlights

This way we know where the line is. Then we are going to repeat the exact same test with different ISO settings.

ISO 800 (native)

ISO 800, not clipping at f/3.2
ISO 800, not clipping at f/3.2
ISO 800, clipping at f/2.8
ISO 800, clipping at f/2.8

ISO 200

ISO 200, not clipping at f/3.2
ISO 200, not clipping at f/3.2
ISO 200, clipping at f/2.8
ISO 200, clipping at f/2.8

ISO 1600

ISO 1600, not clipping at f/3.2
ISO 1600, not clipping at f/3.2
ISO 1600, clipping at f/2.8
ISO 1600, clipping at f/2.8

Observations

From the tests above it’s clear that Zebras remained unchanged. At f/3.2 there was no clipping, and after opening a lens a bit more to f/2.8, white area of the card started to clip. We got the exact same result on every ISO setting which means that ISO has no effect on Zebras and they are most likely calculated at the native ISO 800.

It’s worth noting that the behaviour of histogram is different. The pictures above show that histogram is calculated based on the displayed picture (after applying the LUT and ISO gain).

This is the main reason why we shouldn’t judge the exposure using histogram on the Pocket Camera.

Clipped image at ISO 800 and ISO 1600

Now let’s have a closer look at what happens with hot areas when we increase the ISO to 1600.

Below is the waveform of clipped image at ISO 800 and ISO 1600:

ISO 800 vs ISO 1600 (exposure: -1)
ISO 800 vs ISO 1600 (exposure: -1)

Image on the right was corrected by -1 in exposure to match the left one.

They are identical which means that increasing the ISO to 1600 doesn’t clip the image more. Why is that? Keep in mind that BMPCC records RAW data in 12 bits. This means that the values recorded by the sensor can be amplified and safely stored in 12 bits of data without losing any information.

ProRes (Film and Video mode)

I did the same test with prores codec in both modes (film and video) and while for the film mode results were exactly the same as for RAW, in the video mode I got different results – zebras appeared way before, compared to the previous scenarios. Every exposure change made by ISO setting shifts the histogram as well as updates the Zebras. This means that the Video LUT was probably applied before Zebras were calculated.

Conclusions

  1. RAW – shift in histogram, no zebras change
  2. ProRes Film mode – shift in histogram, no zebras change
  3. ProRes Video mode – shift in histogram, zebras change

Both RAW and ProRes Film mode behave the same, and changing ISO values has no effect on Zebras. Setting zebras to 100% and exposing to the right (ETTR – setting the exposure as high as possible without blowing out the highlights) is valid at any ISO setting.

Below is the diagram I created based off of a results I got and it might not be 100% correct, but according to the behaviour of the camera it seems that it works more or less like this:

BMPCC signal flow
BMPCC signal flow

In the diagram we can see that Zebras go directly from the sensor and might be affected only by Record LUT which is used in one specific case – when the codec is set to ProRes and the mode is set to Video.

Meta indicates that when in RAW mode, the ISO value is stored as a parameter, image data is exactly the same for any ISO value.

  • 100% Zebras = sensor clipping (regardless of any settings)
  • Histogram – not reliable tool in terms of exposure judgement

Golden Rule of exposing with the BMPCC

Shoot RAW, set Zebras to 100% and use ETTR (expose to the right).

The above formula has been confirmed by many professional DPs and delivers stunning results. When you provide enough light to the sensor, the image will be as clean as it can be and the quality will be stunning.

More

Want to read more about this or similar topics? Let me know and subscribe to the newsletter to stay up to date!

No spam, I promise!

The post Understanding BMPCC exposure with Zebras appeared first on tomasz.cc.

]]>
http://tomasz.cc/2015/02/understanding-bmpcc-exposure-zebras/feed/ 11
Caching secrets in DaVinci Resolve http://tomasz.cc/2015/01/caching-secrets-davinci-resolve/ http://tomasz.cc/2015/01/caching-secrets-davinci-resolve/#comments Thu, 01 Jan 2015 16:00:59 +0000 http://tomasz.cc/?p=1469 Caching in DaVinci resolve was mentioned in my recent article about its performance, and today I decided to write a bit more just about this feature. There are 4 caching levels in DaVinci Resolve: Output Cache Node Cache Source Cache Sequence Cache The below diagram shows how the processing flows within DaVinci: To have a...

The post Caching secrets in DaVinci Resolve appeared first on tomasz.cc.

]]>
Caching in DaVinci resolve was mentioned in my recent article about its performance, and today I decided to write a bit more just about this feature.

There are 4 caching levels in DaVinci Resolve:

  1. Output Cache
  2. Node Cache
  3. Source Cache
  4. Sequence Cache

The below diagram shows how the processing flows within DaVinci:

Caching Diagram

To have a full control over the caching process we need to change its mode to User (there’s also smart mode which manages caching automatically; the default one is none though). To enable User Render Cache select the option in the Playback menu:

Enable User Render Cache
Enable User Render Cache

Now we can trigger any type of caching at any level.

Output Cache

Output cache is the last caching point in the processing chain, and it happens just before the frame is sent to playback.

Output cache is designed to improve the editing within Resolve for playback and trimming.

Render Cache Clip Output
Render Cache Clip Output

The only problem with Output Cache is that it gets broken always when there’s any correction made to the clip.

Broken Output Cache

The above picture shows that the render cache is not valid anymore and has to be re-rendered (red colour). Fortunately there are other types of caching allowing us to build on top of them without the need of re-rendering each time we apply any colour correction.

Node Cache

All the changes made within one node can be cached on the node level using Node Cache:

Enable Node Cache
Enable Node Cache

This is the most useful caching type in my opinion and allows to build on top of the cache without breaking it.

Let’s say we apply OpenFX plugin in the first node and then cache the node. After adding serial node after, we can apply all the built-in colour corrections, and the cache is still valid. All the changes are applied on top of the rendered ProRes File.

Node Cache rendered

The situation changes when we try to change anything that is before the cached node, and in this case the node has to be re-rendered:

Broken Node Cache

Good practice is to use Node Cache for 3rd party OpenFX plugins as they usually take a lot of CPU/GPU time and the realtime playback is most likely lost after applying them.

Source Cache

Source cache, as opposed to Output Cache, is rendered before all the color correction adjustments. The only exception is Camera RAW module – any change in there will break the cache.

Render Cache Clip Source
Render Cache Clip Source

Source cache can be treated as on the fly proxy generation. Works really well with formats that are heavy and require a lot of CPU/GPU processing. In my case I use it every time I have RAW footage in my project. After applying Camera RAW settings I enable Source Cache and the playback is not affected by RAW processing/debayering/etc. – it just plays back the cached ProRes file.

Additionally, caching at the source level scales the video to the timeline resolution. So in case we have some 4K footage in the project, and the timeline is set to 1080p, the footage will be downscaled during the caching process.

Sequence Cache

According to the Resolve’s manual there’s no way to trigger Sequence Cache in User mode. It works only in Smart mode and renders clips in the timeline that use composite modes other than Normal and any clips with opacity or speed effects.

Broken Cache

Cache is broken as soon as the change is made before the caching point. This means that:

  1. Output Cache is rendered after all the color corrections, node plugins, etc. so it has to be re-rendered whenever a change is made to the clip.
  2. Node Cache is broken whenever a change is made before this node. Adding a serial node after doesn’t affect it and the cache is still valid.
  3. Source Cache works similar to Proxy files, and it has to be re-rendered whenever a source clip has changed, which in most cases will be when we apply any change to the Camera RAW settings of the RAW footage.

Cache Performance

Keep in mind that cache rendering is triggered whenever it is needed after 5 seconds of inactivity – this value can be changed in the project settings – General Options / Enable background caching after X seconds:

Background Caching delay
Background Caching delay

When this occurs, DaVinci is using your scratch disk as an output drive. To specify the scratch disk for the render cache go to the settings and put your drive at the top of the list:

Scratch Drives
Scratch Drives

To improve the performance, use different disk than your OS drive, and the faster the disk, the better (SSD drive is recommended).

Cleanup

In case you want to free up some space on your scratch disks, there is an option to delete all Render Cache, or just the cache files that are not used in the current timeline (Unused).

Both options are available in the Playback menu at the very bottom:

Delete render cache
Delete render cache

Summary

Caching is really well implemented in DaVinci Resolve and it is flexible enough to use it in various scenarios. It allows smooth editing and color correction without using Proxy files (especially for RAW footage). OpenFX plugins are rarely accelerated by the GPU but thanks to Node Caching we can forget about them and still achieve realtime playback.

I am a big fan of caching within DaVinci Resolve and use it extensively since I’ve learned how to use this feature properly.

If you want to improve the performance of your DaVinci Resolve even further check out my other article describing how to achieve that in 3 steps.

Resources

DaVinci Resolve Lite is completely free piece of software and can be downloaded from the BlackMagic website here:

Subscribe

Stay up to date and don’t miss any DaVinci Resolve tips, tutorials and articles – subscribe for our newsletter:

No spam, I promise!

The post Caching secrets in DaVinci Resolve appeared first on tomasz.cc.

]]>
http://tomasz.cc/2015/01/caching-secrets-davinci-resolve/feed/ 3
How to improve DaVinci Resolve performance in 3 steps http://tomasz.cc/2014/12/improve-davinci-resolve-performance-3-steps/ http://tomasz.cc/2014/12/improve-davinci-resolve-performance-3-steps/#comments Sat, 27 Dec 2014 21:23:26 +0000 http://tomasz.cc/?p=1455 Blackmagic DaVinci Resolve is highly optimized piece of software, and when it is used with high quality hardware, it can deliver stunning performance when grading even RAW footage with tons of color correction nodes. That being said, there are situations when even most powerful setups start to slow down. This can happen especially when using...

The post How to improve DaVinci Resolve performance in 3 steps appeared first on tomasz.cc.

]]>
Blackmagic DaVinci Resolve is highly optimized piece of software, and when it is used with high quality hardware, it can deliver stunning performance when grading even RAW footage with tons of color correction nodes.

That being said, there are situations when even most powerful setups start to slow down. This can happen especially when using OpenFX plugins.

Low FPS
Low FPS

Here are a few tips that can improve the performance of Resolve significantly and make working with the app smooth.

Optimize for playback

There are couple of options in the project settings that can improve the playback within the application, and you can find them under:

Optimize for playback
Optimize for playback

In both cases use Optimize for Playback to sacrifice the quality a bit, but deliver smoother playback. In some cases this is enough to keep the realtime playback while grading.

Camera RAW

When we are working with RAW footage we have the option to change the way how the RAW data is decoded.

Decode Quality
Decode Quality

Under the project settings, in the Camera RAW section we can change the Decode Quality to anything lower than Full Res. (Half Res. or Quarter Res.).

Caching

Last but not least, and definetely my best personal tip to improve the performance of DaVinci Resolve is CACHING.

It can be enabled in the Playback menu, under Render Cache.

Render Cache
Render Cache

For a quick setup just select Smart and let DaVinci Resolve handle the decision making when to use render caching.

When the caching is enabled, you will see the indication of the proccess above the clips in the edit mode, as well as above the nodes in color mode.

Caching indication in Edit mode
Caching indication in Edit mode

Red color means that there was a change and Resolve needs to re-render the clip.

Caching indication in Color mode
Caching indication in Color mode

Cases when DaVinci uses Render Cache unconditionally is:

  1. RAW footage (for source rendering)
  2. OpenFX plugins – anytime you drop any OpenFX plugin on any node

In the project preferences we have the option to select the format for the Cache Rendering. The default one is ProRes 422 HQ.

Cache frames in
Cache frames in

You can read more in my detailed article exclusively focused on caching in Davinci Resolve.

Scratch Disks (NEW)

This one has been suggested by MelbFilm bmcuser forum, and becomes 4th tip on this list. The first drive on the below list in the application settings becomes the scratch disk and all the stills and cache files are stored there.

Scratch Disks
Scratch Disks

The best way to use it is to select different drive than your OS drive. This way caching and previewing the footage will have less impact on the performance of the system and Resolve itself. SSD drives work best on account of their high data transfer rates.

Summary

I hope the above tips will help you get the workflow within DaVinci Resolve to the next level, and the application will not slow you down, either by using sophisticated processing or by using a bit slower hardware.

I recommend using Render Cache whenever we work with RAW footage and OpenFX plugins.

If you know any other ways to improve Resolve speed, let me know in the comments below!

Subscribe

Stay up to date and don’t miss any DaVinci Resolve tips, tutorials and articles – subscribe for our newsletter:

No spam, I promise!

The post How to improve DaVinci Resolve performance in 3 steps appeared first on tomasz.cc.

]]>
http://tomasz.cc/2014/12/improve-davinci-resolve-performance-3-steps/feed/ 4
How to use DaVinci Resolve to detect cuts and split the video http://tomasz.cc/2014/11/use-davinci-resolve-detect-cuts-split-video/ http://tomasz.cc/2014/11/use-davinci-resolve-detect-cuts-split-video/#comments Fri, 28 Nov 2014 17:00:54 +0000 http://tomasz.cc/?p=1432 Let’s say we have a video that we want to color correct but we don’t have a project file – just the rendered video, or a project file is not compatible with our color grading suite. To be able to color correct the project we need to split it into single takes. Cutting the clip...

The post How to use DaVinci Resolve to detect cuts and split the video appeared first on tomasz.cc.

]]>
Let’s say we have a video that we want to color correct but we don’t have a project file – just the rendered video, or a project file is not compatible with our color grading suite.

To be able to color correct the project we need to split it into single takes. Cutting the clip manually is a really tedious work, but luckily there’s a solution for that. A FREE automated way of doing exactly what I described above.

DaVinci Resolve 11 Lite

All we need is DaVinci Resolve 11 Lite, which can be downloaded from the blackmagic website (in case you don’t have it already).

When Resolve is up and running navigate to the Media tab and find your video clip.

If you cannot find the directory on the list you need to add the location in the program options, so the program knows where to look for the footage. Once you found your clip, right click on it and select Scene Cut Detection. A new window will pop up.

Scene Cut Detection

To get right into the action press Start. The detection process starts and it usually takes some time.

The finished process looks similar to the one below. Vertical lines represent the detected cuts. The higher the line, the more certain DaVinci is about that particular cut. The magenta line is the threshold of the detection. You can move it up and down accepting more or less certain cut points.

You can add or remove the cut points manually too. Just go to the desired place movin the indicator on top of the detection track and use the buttons below marked with + and .

On the right side you see the list of the cut points.

The preview pane shows:

  1. The frame before the cut
  2. The 1st frame after the cut
  3. The 2nd frame after the cut

So for each detected cut point the display should show you the first frame which is different from two other frames which should be very similar.

Navigating through all the cut points with keyboard shortcuts n for next and p for previous can be really quick to evalueate false positives looking at the display.

To evaluate false negatives – the cut lines that are below the magenta line, we need to playback the whole video and make sure DaVinci didn’t skip the true cut point.

Once we are done we can save the detection project using the top right menu (3 dots) and press Add Cuts to Media Pool. Now, our video clip is split into takes and all of them are added to our media pool.

Color Correction

We can now create a Timeline with all of the takes and go straight to the color correction. To do that, navigate to Edit tab, in the Timelines area rightclick and select Create New Timeline, and uncheck Empty Timeline. This way DaVinci will automatically add the takes in the right order to our timeline.

We can also export the clips individually if we wish to color grade them in a different software (for instance After Effects).

When the timeline is ready, we just go right to the Deliver tab, and select Individual Source Clips in the Video panel. Adjust the settings for your needs, Add Job to Render Queue and press Start Render.

More

Want to read more about this or similar topics? Let me know and subscribe to the newsletter to stay up to date!

No spam, I promise!

The post How to use DaVinci Resolve to detect cuts and split the video appeared first on tomasz.cc.

]]>
http://tomasz.cc/2014/11/use-davinci-resolve-detect-cuts-split-video/feed/ 0
Deconstructing the Photo episode 1 http://tomasz.cc/2014/11/deconstructing-photo-episode-1/ http://tomasz.cc/2014/11/deconstructing-photo-episode-1/#comments Sun, 16 Nov 2014 18:04:40 +0000 http://tomasz.cc/?p=1421 Welcome to my first episode in the series called Deconstructing the Photo In the video below I will show you everything you need to know about this particular picture. From the preparation and execution to the postproduction process. I’m going to give you some hints on how to prepare for the photoshoot better, how to choose...

The post Deconstructing the Photo episode 1 appeared first on tomasz.cc.

]]>
Welcome to my first episode in the series called Deconstructing the Photo
In the video below I will show you everything you need to know about this particular picture. From the preparation and execution to the postproduction process.
I’m going to give you some hints on how to prepare for the photoshoot better, how to choose the best settings and equipment using this photo as an example.
I’m going to show you how I edited the picture in Lightroom and Adobe Photoshop, going over every single layer and explaining what I did and what was the reason behind each step.

This series is some sort of a photo breakdown, and I think might give you some idea about the whole process I go through and perhaps will raise some questions and maybe some of your ideas will help me improve my workflow too.

Hope this video is useful for you, and if you like it there’s gonna be more episodes in the near future. Let me know what you think, what might be improved and anything else in the comments below.

Additional resources

Download Orton Effect Photoshop action mentioned at the end of the video.

More

Want to read more about this or similar topics? Let me know and subscribe to the newsletter to stay up to date!

No spam, I promise!

The post Deconstructing the Photo episode 1 appeared first on tomasz.cc.

]]>
http://tomasz.cc/2014/11/deconstructing-photo-episode-1/feed/ 0
Fixing skin tones, bmpcc footage, Resolve screencast http://tomasz.cc/2014/11/fixing-skin-tones-bmpcc-footage-resolve-screencast/ http://tomasz.cc/2014/11/fixing-skin-tones-bmpcc-footage-resolve-screencast/#comments Wed, 05 Nov 2014 16:00:53 +0000 http://tomasz.cc/?p=1406 A few days ago one of the users at the BMPCC facebook group asked for help with color correcting his footage. He recorded some material with the improper white-balance and in problematic lighting conditions (probably some mixture of LED lights). I gave it a shot and recorded a screencast while I was doing it. Here’s...

The post Fixing skin tones, bmpcc footage, Resolve screencast appeared first on tomasz.cc.

]]>
A few days ago one of the users at the BMPCC facebook group asked for help with color correcting his footage. He recorded some material with the improper white-balance and in problematic lighting conditions (probably some mixture of LED lights).

I gave it a shot and recorded a screencast while I was doing it.

Here’s more or less what I did:

  1. Correcting the levels with gain and lift controls in the first node
  2. Selecting skin tones with a quilifier
  3. Creating outside node with non-skin selection
  4. Selecting the reds and enhancing them in 4th node
  5. Fixing the green cast in the skin in 5th node
  6. Vignette in the 6th node
  7. Global contrast and some color adjustments in the last one

Useful shortcuts

  • ⌘+d – disable current node
  • ⌥+d – disable all nodes
  • ⌥+s – create new serial node

More

Want to read more about this or similar topics? Let me know and subscribe to the newsletter to stay up to date!

No spam, I promise!

The post Fixing skin tones, bmpcc footage, Resolve screencast appeared first on tomasz.cc.

]]>
http://tomasz.cc/2014/11/fixing-skin-tones-bmpcc-footage-resolve-screencast/feed/ 1
Shooting Music Video with ML RAW Part 2 (editing) http://tomasz.cc/2014/10/shooting-music-video-ml-raw-part-2/ http://tomasz.cc/2014/10/shooting-music-video-ml-raw-part-2/#comments Sun, 26 Oct 2014 21:03:44 +0000 http://blog.tomasz.cc/?p=685 How to deal with almost 1TB of RAW footage Do you have to spend hours rendering proxy files to be able to edit them? ACR or Davinci Resolve? I you haven’t read the first part, head out to the previous one first. This post is a continuation of the process describing the postproduction phase of...

The post Shooting Music Video with ML RAW Part 2 (editing) appeared first on tomasz.cc.

]]>
  • How to deal with almost 1TB of RAW footage
  • Do you have to spend hours rendering proxy files to be able to edit them?
  • ACR or Davinci Resolve?
  • I you haven’t read the first part, head out to the previous one first. This post is a continuation of the process describing the postproduction phase of a project shot exclusively on 5D Mark III using Magic Lantern RAW.

    In this part I’m going to answer to the above questions and give you some ideas how to deal with tons of RAW footage and how to do it efficiently.

    Data

    As you already know I ended up with almost 1TB of RAW footage. What did I do first? Backup.

    Once our data is safe these are the steps I follow:

    1. Import all the footage into Davinci Resolve
    2. Apply very general color correction to the whole timeline (probably some sort of LUT to preview the footage in Rec. 709).
    3. Initial selection – reject all the useless footage. Clips that were recorded accidentally, not properly focused or just really bad takes that we know we cannot use for sure.

    Proxy files

    Our timeline consists now of the clips that might be used for the editing. To be able to edit the footage in Premiere Pro we need to transcode the footage. Luckily Resolve handles DNG files very well and Proxy generation is pretty fast.

    DNG Workflow
    DNG Workflow

    Why not to edit in Resolve? If you intend to edit and color correct/grade in Resolve as well, you are good to go. But in case you want to do the color correction and grading in After Effects, editing in Resolve will cause some problems (I will get back to this later).

    I use ProRes LT or Proxy for my proxies and I export them as individual clips.

    The edit

    Editing a music video is usually easier than editing a short movie. First of all you have the music track that you have to align all the clips to. Most of the takes were recorded to the music being played in the background, so the first step is to sync all the clips to the original track.

    Syncing the clips with the music
    Syncing the clips with the music

    What I do in this case is I group all my clips into 2 categories:

    1. Music clips
    2. B-roll

    The first one has the music in the clip itself so it can be synced with the audio track. However some of the clips containing music go to the B-roll category when the music is not relevant. It might be just a closeup or a part without singing, that we can put in any place in the video.

    All the clips with music are aligned
    All the clips with music are aligned

    Once the clips are categorized I take them one by one and align them to the main track. If the reference audio is good enough, the clip can be synced automatically in Premiere (or some other 3rd party tool like Plural Eyes). If not, we need to do that manually.

    When all the clips from the first category are on the timeline, the next step is to pick and reject. I hide all the layers except for the first one, and I go along and cut the best pieces out of it. Once I’m done with it, I enable the second one and repeat. When I’m done with all the tracks it looks more or less like that:

    Keeping only good parts of the clips
    Keeping only good parts of the clips

    At this stage I create seperate timeline with my B-roll takes, and I try to pick and reject as much as possible.

    Then I would copy all the remaining pieces to the main timeline.

    Depending on the quantity of takes and angles it might happen that we don’t have enough coverage from the music clips – then we cann fill the gaps with the B-roll. In my case there were no gaps so I just edited the whole video moving the b-roll around the synced clips in many iterations until I was happy with the cut, which looks more or less like this:

    Final edit
    Final edit

    Multicam

    Multicam feature in Premiere Pro is another approach to edit the video, but in my opinion it works well with fewer clips. In my case editing 24 tracks with multicam was not that convinient so I just edited it in a regular way. Additionally, running multicam with 24 tracks would kill my hard drive… I would probably need to transcode all the clips to a really low resolution and bitrate to be able to playback all of them in realtime.

    Color correction and grading

    After the editing is done and we are left with the final cut it’s time for the color correction and grading.

    In the part 3 I will cover how my process look like in detail. Stay tuned!

    Other parts

    More

    Want to read more about this or similar topics? Let me know and subscribe to the newsletter to stay up to date!

    [wysija_form id=”2″]

    No spam, I promise!

    The post Shooting Music Video with ML RAW Part 2 (editing) appeared first on tomasz.cc.

    ]]>
    http://tomasz.cc/2014/10/shooting-music-video-ml-raw-part-2/feed/ 1
    SMS Relay, iOS 8.1, Yosemite, Not registered with iMessage http://tomasz.cc/2014/10/sms-relay-ios-8-1-yosemite-registered-imessage/ http://tomasz.cc/2014/10/sms-relay-ios-8-1-yosemite-registered-imessage/#comments Tue, 21 Oct 2014 15:30:17 +0000 http://blog.tomasz.cc/?p=726 Yosemite brings a fresh feature allowing us to answer the call from devices other than iPhone. But what about SMS? I spent some time trying to figure it out, googling it all around and it is not as straight forward as I thought. Configuration There are a few steps that have to be performed prior...

    The post SMS Relay, iOS 8.1, Yosemite, Not registered with iMessage appeared first on tomasz.cc.

    ]]>
    Yosemite brings a fresh feature allowing us to answer the call from devices other than iPhone. But what about SMS? I spent some time trying to figure it out, googling it all around and it is not as straight forward as I thought.

    Configuration

    There are a few steps that have to be performed prior to be able to send SMS from non-iPhone devices.

    First of all we need to enable Text Message Forwarding on our iPhone. We can do that in the Settings / Messages section. We can select all the devices linked with our Apple ID that will be allowed to send SMS through the iPhone:

    iPhone settings
    Once we select the device on the list, we need to provide the password that the selected device will display.

    iPad verification code
    As soon as the code is provided we are able to send SMS messages from everywhere. It can be easily identified by opening Messages app on Yosemite and trying to compose a new message with a phone number. It should be highlighted green when the SMS relay is working. Otherwise it goes RED and we will see the message box mentioned in the post title.

    The post SMS Relay, iOS 8.1, Yosemite, Not registered with iMessage appeared first on tomasz.cc.

    ]]>
    http://tomasz.cc/2014/10/sms-relay-ios-8-1-yosemite-registered-imessage/feed/ 6
    Hannibal – grading decomposition http://tomasz.cc/2014/10/hannibal-grading-decomposition/ http://tomasz.cc/2014/10/hannibal-grading-decomposition/#comments Thu, 16 Oct 2014 11:45:28 +0000 http://blog.tomasz.cc/?p=719 Hannibal is one of the movie series where the color grading plays a large part in the post production process. I’m always impressed how they use color to change the mood and how this affects the perception of the show. Reverse engineering I thought to myself – if I could revert the grading process and...

    The post Hannibal – grading decomposition appeared first on tomasz.cc.

    ]]>
    Hannibal is one of the movie series where the color grading plays a large part in the post production process. I’m always impressed how they use color to change the mood and how this affects the perception of the show.

    Reverse engineering

    I thought to myself – if I could revert the grading process and restore more natural look that came out from the camera, I would automatically learn how the grading was achieved.

    I took a few screenshots from one of the episodes from the second season, and started playing around with color adjustments. Here’s what I got:

    Conclusions

    Obviously my before versions are not what came out from the camera, but at least it removed the final stylised look. The whole colour correction and grading process was certainly much more complex to reach my before stage, but I’m pretty sure that if I saw the raw footage straight from the camera I would be impressed as well. So why does the show look so good? It’s all about the lighting and the production design that makes the show look fantastic. The grading is just one ingredient, and even if our grading skills are phenomenal without good lighting and well prepared set we are not going to achieve beautiful pictures.

    A few more

    Here are a few more from the first season, as I had an impression the color grading was a bit different before. It seems that the same techniques were used, however in the second season they pushed the color grading a bit more.

    Tools used

    The only tool I used was Colorista II plugin from the Red Giant. All I did was move the color wheels around. Some of the examples above were achieved by this settings:

    If we apply the opposite settings on a natural balanced image, we should get something similar to what we see on the show (assuming our lighting and production design is on the same level… ).

    More

    Want to read more about this or similar topics? Let me know and subscribe to the newsletter to stay up to date!

    No spam, I promise!

    The post Hannibal – grading decomposition appeared first on tomasz.cc.

    ]]>
    http://tomasz.cc/2014/10/hannibal-grading-decomposition/feed/ 4
    BMPCC ISO 1600 performance test http://tomasz.cc/2014/10/bmpcc-iso-1600-performance-test/ http://tomasz.cc/2014/10/bmpcc-iso-1600-performance-test/#comments Thu, 09 Oct 2014 16:00:25 +0000 http://blog.tomasz.cc/?p=703 Is ISO 1600 usable on a pocket camera? How to post process the footage to preserve the details? Can the noise be lowered to usable levels? I am still in the process of learning my new toy – BlackMagic Pocket Cinema Camera. One of the tests I did some time ago was to shoot a...

    The post BMPCC ISO 1600 performance test appeared first on tomasz.cc.

    ]]>
  • Is ISO 1600 usable on a pocket camera?
  • How to post process the footage to preserve the details?
  • Can the noise be lowered to usable levels?
  • I am still in the process of learning my new toy – BlackMagic Pocket Cinema Camera. One of the tests I did some time ago was to shoot a few clips in the low lighting conditions at ISO 1600, and slightly underexpose the footage. In the next step I was playing with the material trying to recover as much details as possible and minimizing the noise to acceptable levels.

    Video samples

    BMPCC ISO 1600 performance test

    Basic grading

    Let’s apply some grading to the footage to bring some life and colour:

    The corrections consist of:

    1. Initial adjustments in the CameraRAW section
    2. BMD Film to VisionLOG LUT
    3. M31 LUT from VisionColor
    Camera RAW settings
    Camera RAW settings
    Resolve nodes
    Resolve nodes

    At the moment footage looks like this (click for full resolution screen grab):

    Grading before & after

    We increased the nosie by pushing the exposure and we are going to deal with that in AfterEffects:

    Filters applied here:

    1. NeatVideo
    2. Unsharp Mask
    3. FilmConvert
    Filters
    AE filters

    The first on reduced the original noise patterns from the BMPCC sensor, the latter one added some 35mm grain and a little bit of curves and analogue color.

    The before and after samples can be seen below:

    Before & After
    Before & After

    Summary

    It all depends how much we push the material but as long as the adjustments are not massive, the quality should be preserved. NeatVideo seems to be reducing the nosie without affecting the details that much and the grain added in FilmConvert gives this nice analogue touch and boosts up a bit the details that were softened by the denoiser.

    Overall I think that ISO 1600 on BMPCC is usable and the footage can definetely bu used if exposed properly.

    More

    Want to read more about this or similar topics? Let me know and subscribe to the newsletter to stay up to date!

    No spam, I promise!

    The post BMPCC ISO 1600 performance test appeared first on tomasz.cc.

    ]]>
    http://tomasz.cc/2014/10/bmpcc-iso-1600-performance-test/feed/ 0
    Shooting Music Video with ML RAW Part 1 http://tomasz.cc/2014/09/shooting-music-video-ml-raw-5d-mark-iii/ http://tomasz.cc/2014/09/shooting-music-video-ml-raw-5d-mark-iii/#comments Fri, 26 Sep 2014 16:15:01 +0000 http://blog.tomasz.cc/?p=12 Is Magic Lantern stable enough to use it in a commercial project? Is it worth spending so much more time in RAW processing instead of simply using h.264 internal codec? Is it possible to shoot on location with just two 64 GiB CF cards that hold around 11 minutes of RAW footage each? How to...

    The post Shooting Music Video with ML RAW Part 1 appeared first on tomasz.cc.

    ]]>
  • Is Magic Lantern stable enough to use it in a commercial project?
  • Is it worth spending so much more time in RAW processing instead of simply using h.264 internal codec?
  • Is it possible to shoot on location with just two 64 GiB CF cards that hold around 11 minutes of RAW footage each?
  • How to manage hundreds of gigabytes of data while shooting?
  • In this post I will try to answer those questions by describing you how I shot a music video using Magic Lantern on my Canon 5D Mark III.

    Location

    The location was quite difficult exposure-wise, to say the least. The sun rays were hitting the place only for a few hours around noon, behaving like a spot light getting through the trees. Strong mediterranean sun was creating lots of contrast between deep shadows and very harsh highlights.

    Without RAW it wouldn’t have been possible to capture the dynamic range of the scene.

    Harsh light, deep shadows, frame grab
    Harsh light, deep shadows, frame grab

    Second location for the clip was in direct sun so we had to wait for the sun to go down and shoot during the sunset.

    Gear

    The whole music video was shot using the following equipment:

    • Canon 5D Mark III
    • Samyang 35mm T1.5
    • Canon 24-105mm f/4 VR
    • Samyang 85mm T1.5
    • Tripod, slider, Glidecam HD 4000
    • 2x 64 GiB Komputerbay CF cards

    And last but not least, the 2 most important accessories helping me out with the difficult lighting conditions:

    • LCW Fader MK II
    • 120×80 5in1 Reflector

    Workflow

    At the location I was also using my MacBook Pro 15” to dump the footage from the cards. To extract DNG files directly from CF card I plugged it into Lexmark USB 3.0 card reader and processed all the files with MlRawViewer. As an output drive I used internal SSD to make the offloading quick. Then I would move the DNG files to internal 1 TB drive to make some room on SSD for the next footage.

    Using this technique I was able to shoot continuously for 10-11 minutes, swap the cards and shoot again. I had to keep track of the remaining time on the card so that I wouldn’t

    run out of space in the middle of the important take.

    Transferring the data
    Transferring the data

    During longer breaks I was connecting the LaCie Rugged 2TB USB 3.0 drive and was doing the backup of the footage.

    Another benefit of using MlRawViewer was a quick preview of the footage allowing me to make sure that nothing was broken, and there were no pink stripes or write errors on the CF cards (which occasionally had happened before on earlier versions of Magic Lantern).

    Magic Lantern

    Enabled modules and features:

    • MLV
    • MLV sound
    • focus peaking
    • histogram
    • 1920×1080 @ 25p

    The most crucial settings in Magic Lantern are shown below:

    Magic Lantern settings
    Magic Lantern settings

    Keep in mind that overlays during the recording slow down CPU and increase the risk of dropping frames. I would have loved to have focus peaking while shooting, but the reliability was more important here.

    I didn’t use any other ML features such as HDR or DualISO not to degrade the quality in any way and most of the takes were exposed well enough to get all the details out of the RAW files.

    MLV Sound was enabled to allow me to sync the music in the post production easily. We were playing the song from the macbook and recording the backing track using Rode VideoMic Pro to get better reference sound than the internal 5D audio recorder (the stream from the waterfall was making quite a lot of noise).

    Stability

    Magic Lantern didn’t crash at all.
    The camera didn’t freeze, not even once.
    None of the MLV files was damaged.
    No pink stripes, no green tint.
    I didn’t experience ANY problems at all during the whole shootout.

    I was able to record throughout the whole 4 minute song in one take. The longest take was over 5 minutes and it was stopped by me (not by ML).

    The only issue I found was when I ran out of space on the card and ML stopped recording, the wav file was not complete (it was a few seconds shorter than the video file). And this wasn’t a problem for me at all since I was recording only the reference audio to be able to sync it later to the original song.

    The light

    As I mentioned in the Location section, the lighting was difficult. Especially for the wider shots, where the dynamic range of the scene was really wide. I was trying to shoot medium shots and closeups when the light was strong – I could use the reflector to even out the shadows and reduce the contrast. For wider shots I had to wait for a cloud to cover the sun partially.

    The lighting
    The lighting

    This way I could capture interesting light without the highlights being completely blown-out and before the light was gone leaving a very flat looking place.

    Postproduction

    When the shooting part is done we need to switch to postprocessing mode. The complete workflow for processing almost 1TB of RAW footage will be described soon in another post, so stay tuned and subscribe not to miss it!


    Warning

    Please note that I DO NOT recommend using Magic Lantern for professional work unless you are 100% sure you can put the project at risk. My preparation consisted of weeks of thorough testing the firmware and making sure I could rely on it. Every version of the firmware can introduce new bugs and destabilise the camera completely.

    USE AT YOUR OWN RISK.

    Next Parts

    More

    Want to read more about this or similar topics? Let me know and subscribe to the newsletter to stay up to date!

    No spam, I promise!

    The post Shooting Music Video with ML RAW Part 1 appeared first on tomasz.cc.

    ]]>
    http://tomasz.cc/2014/09/shooting-music-video-ml-raw-5d-mark-iii/feed/ 2
    The Middleman Official Trailer http://tomasz.cc/2014/08/middleman-official-trailer/ http://tomasz.cc/2014/08/middleman-official-trailer/#comments Sun, 24 Aug 2014 07:07:08 +0000 http://tomasz.cc/?p=1081 The short movie we have been working on for the past few months is an action movie with a slight touch of the comedy. Shot in Cyprus and entirely funded by ourselves. It took around 14 days of shooting, including locations such as Larnaca Airport. The final movie is still in the works, but for...

    The post The Middleman Official Trailer appeared first on tomasz.cc.

    ]]>

    The short movie we have been working on for the past few months is an action movie with a slight touch of the comedy. Shot in Cyprus and entirely funded by ourselves. It took around 14 days of shooting, including locations such as Larnaca Airport. The final movie is still in the works, but for the time being please enjoy our recently released trailer!

    Technical details:

    • Shot with Canon 5D Mark III and GoPro III Black (mounted on a hexacopter for aerial shots)
    • Lenses used: Canon 17-40 f/4L, Canon 70-200 f/2.8L IS, Samyang 14mm T3.1, Samyang 24mm/35mm/85mm T1.5
    • Manfrotto tripod with fluid head, Konova lider, Glidecam HD 4000
    • Lilliput monitor, LED portable lights

    Vimeo & YouTube links

    The post The Middleman Official Trailer appeared first on tomasz.cc.

    ]]>
    http://tomasz.cc/2014/08/middleman-official-trailer/feed/ 0
    Quick Open/Save dialogs OS X TIP http://tomasz.cc/2014/08/quick-opensave-dialogs-os-x-tip/ http://tomasz.cc/2014/08/quick-opensave-dialogs-os-x-tip/#comments Thu, 21 Aug 2014 15:36:41 +0000 http://blog.tomasz.cc/?p=637 I have been using Mac for quite a long time now, and just today I’ve discovered a very useful thing in the open/save dialogs. The power of a “/” key When the open or save dialog opens, press “/” key (forward slash) and you will see a new window with a text field where you...

    The post Quick Open/Save dialogs OS X TIP appeared first on tomasz.cc.

    ]]>
    I have been using Mac for quite a long time now, and just today I’ve discovered a very useful thing in the open/save dialogs.

    The power of a “/” key

    When the open or save dialog opens, press “/” key (forward slash) and you will see a new window with a text field where you can paste a path to the directory or a file without actually browsing through the UI and selecting each sub-folder one by one manually.

    We can quickly combine it with a ForkLift and its Copy Path to Clipboard in the context menu, and immediately paste the selected path in the open/save window.

    Screenshot 2014-08-20 18.27.28

    Big time saver for me.

    The post Quick Open/Save dialogs OS X TIP appeared first on tomasz.cc.

    ]]>
    http://tomasz.cc/2014/08/quick-opensave-dialogs-os-x-tip/feed/ 0
    Apps missing in App Store Purchases section http://tomasz.cc/2014/08/apps-missing-app-store-purchases-section/ http://tomasz.cc/2014/08/apps-missing-app-store-purchases-section/#comments Sun, 17 Aug 2014 15:33:25 +0000 http://blog.tomasz.cc/?p=633 Soon after upgrading my Mac I noticed one worrying thing – some of my apps purchased months ago in Mac App Store were not available on the Purchases list to install on my new machine. For instant solution go to the last paragraph Investigation Initially I thought that maybe there’s a special license and the...

    The post Apps missing in App Store Purchases section appeared first on tomasz.cc.

    ]]>
    Soon after upgrading my Mac I noticed one worrying thing – some of my apps purchased months ago in Mac App Store were not available on the Purchases list to install on my new machine.

    For instant solution go to the last paragraph

    Investigation

    Initially I thought that maybe there’s a special license and the application could be used only on one machine, but after some googling I found out that apps are linked with Apple ID and can be installed without any other restrictions.


    I still had access to my previous Mac so I opened App Store, and surprisingly, I couldn’t find those apps there as well! The only place I could still see the app was when I searched for them in the App Store, and I could see Installed caption below the app icon in the results grid.

    After spending some time online I found how to browse through the whole purchase history for a given Apple ID (#1), and what I noticed was that I was able to see and install apps after a certain point in time (beginning of 2014). Initially I thought that maybe the store was showing only the apps purchased in the current year but it didn’t make much sense, and there was no way to look back for earlier purchases.

    #1 Accessing full iTunes purchase history

    1. Open iTunes and from your library go to the Store located in the right top corner of the application window
    2. Click on your account name on the top left side and select Account from the popup window
    3. Under History click on View all to see all your purchases associated with your Apple ID in chronological order

    Apple ID Country change

    Then it hit me. It was the time when I switched the App Store Country from Cypriot to Polish. It seemed that all the apps purchased in the Cypriot App Store disappeared from my purchases list. They were still installed on my old Mac and running just fine though. A few more google searches led me to the…

    Solution

    All I had to do was to contact iTunes Store Support and explain the situation. It took about 10 minutes to get all my apps back. It seems it’s a very simple procedure for the Apple staff – probably one click of a button, and all the purchases linked with Apple ID are reissued for the current country. All I had to do after that was to click Store / Check for Available Downloads in iTunes and Store / Check for Unfinished Downloads in App Store. All the missing apps reappeared and were downloaded automatically.

    The post Apps missing in App Store Purchases section appeared first on tomasz.cc.

    ]]>
    http://tomasz.cc/2014/08/apps-missing-app-store-purchases-section/feed/ 0
    Drifting Sunday, Agios Silas, Cyprus http://tomasz.cc/2013/08/drifting-sunday-agios-silas-cyprus/ http://tomasz.cc/2013/08/drifting-sunday-agios-silas-cyprus/#comments Mon, 26 Aug 2013 16:00:25 +0000 http://tomasz.cc/?p=762 While shooting some videos with my friends they entered the parking lot and started doing a lot of noise… Couldn’t resist but record them! Unfortunately my hand was tired after the whole day of shooting, so shots are not very stable… Still, I’m glad I had this opportunity! [divider line_type=”Small Line” custom_height=””][ylwm_vimeo width=700 height=394]71871474[/ylwm_vimeo]

    The post Drifting Sunday, Agios Silas, Cyprus appeared first on tomasz.cc.

    ]]>
    While shooting some videos with my friends they entered the parking lot and started doing a lot of noise… Couldn’t resist but record them! Unfortunately my hand was tired after the whole day of shooting, so shots are not very stable… Still, I’m glad I had this opportunity!
    [divider line_type=”Small Line” custom_height=””][ylwm_vimeo width=700 height=394]71871474[/ylwm_vimeo]

    The post Drifting Sunday, Agios Silas, Cyprus appeared first on tomasz.cc.

    ]]>
    http://tomasz.cc/2013/08/drifting-sunday-agios-silas-cyprus/feed/ 0
    Shooting Sunrises, guest post for The Giving Lens http://tomasz.cc/2013/06/shooting-sunrises-guest-post-giving-lens/ http://tomasz.cc/2013/06/shooting-sunrises-guest-post-giving-lens/#comments Sun, 30 Jun 2013 15:28:35 +0000 http://blog.tomasz.cc/?p=629 A few weeks ago my post called Shooting Sunrise was published on The Giving Lens blog. More about the website and the idea behind it you can read here. Check out the gallery and other interesting blog posts, I’m sure you can find many useful information and wonderful pictures! Shooting Sunrises – guest post for...

    The post Shooting Sunrises, guest post for The Giving Lens appeared first on tomasz.cc.

    ]]>
    A few weeks ago my post called Shooting Sunrise was published on The Giving Lens blog. More about the website and the idea behind it you can read here. Check out the gallery and other interesting blog posts, I’m sure you can find many useful information and wonderful pictures!

    Shooting Sunrises – guest post for The Giving Lens

    The post Shooting Sunrises, guest post for The Giving Lens appeared first on tomasz.cc.

    ]]>
    http://tomasz.cc/2013/06/shooting-sunrises-guest-post-giving-lens/feed/ 0
    Complete post-processing tutorial, DRI, blending, lightroom, photoshop http://tomasz.cc/2013/05/complete-post-processing-tutorial-dri-blending-lightroom-photoshop/ http://tomasz.cc/2013/05/complete-post-processing-tutorial-dri-blending-lightroom-photoshop/#comments Fri, 03 May 2013 08:30:28 +0000 http://tomasz.cc/?p=607 I’ve recorded the post-processing of one of my recent photos, and added descriptive captions, hope you like it! It’s the whole process from the very beginning – I import RAW files in Lightroom, adjust them initially, then blend them together in photoshop and process them to the very end! [ylwm_vimeo width=700 height=394]65361016[/ylwm_vimeo] Complete post-processing tutorial, DRI,...

    The post Complete post-processing tutorial, DRI, blending, lightroom, photoshop appeared first on tomasz.cc.

    ]]>
    I’ve recorded the post-processing of one of my recent photos, and added descriptive captions, hope you like it! It’s the whole process from the very beginning – I import RAW files in Lightroom, adjust them initially, then blend them together in photoshop and process them to the very end!

    [ylwm_vimeo width=700 height=394]65361016[/ylwm_vimeo]

    Complete post-processing tutorial, DRI, blending, lightroom, photoshop

    Photoshop File (1600px) with all the layers

    Download complete photoshop file that was created in the tutorial above. The image size is 1600px on the longer edge and the file size is around 100MB.
    You can download the file for 3 EUR or more (name your price).

    [donationdownloads id=”1″]

    The post Complete post-processing tutorial, DRI, blending, lightroom, photoshop appeared first on tomasz.cc.

    ]]>
    http://tomasz.cc/2013/05/complete-post-processing-tutorial-dri-blending-lightroom-photoshop/feed/ 2
    Life Street Festival Limassol 2013 http://tomasz.cc/2013/05/life-street-festival-limassol-2013/ http://tomasz.cc/2013/05/life-street-festival-limassol-2013/#comments Wed, 01 May 2013 07:15:37 +0000 http://tomasz.cc/?p=601 Recently I started using my camera also for some video work, and this is my first official movie I shot a few days ago at the Life Street Festival Limassol 2013, Cyprus. I was focused mostly on graffiti artists doing great job and painting all over the streets of Limassol city centre. A few of...

    The post Life Street Festival Limassol 2013 appeared first on tomasz.cc.

    ]]>
    Recently I started using my camera also for some video work, and this is my first official movie I shot a few days ago at the Life Street Festival Limassol 2013, Cyprus. I was focused mostly on graffiti artists doing great job and painting all over the streets of Limassol city centre. A few of them were really spectacular. I hope my video below captured at least a fraction of what was going on there!

    Life Street Festival, Limassol, Cyprus, 27th of April 2013

    The post Life Street Festival Limassol 2013 appeared first on tomasz.cc.

    ]]>
    http://tomasz.cc/2013/05/life-street-festival-limassol-2013/feed/ 0
    I want to shoot at night! http://tomasz.cc/2013/04/i-want-to-shoot-at-night/ http://tomasz.cc/2013/04/i-want-to-shoot-at-night/#comments Thu, 18 Apr 2013 19:00:43 +0000 http://tomasz.cc/tumblr/?p=53 Hold on a second, cowboy. First of all, if you really want to start taking pictures during the night, you need to get familiar with manual mode. There’s no possibility that you will get nice results using auto mode or night preset. Another issue is that without a tripod there’s a small chance that your...

    The post I want to shoot at night! appeared first on tomasz.cc.

    ]]>
    Hold on a second, cowboy. First of all, if you really want to start taking pictures during the night, you need to get familiar with manual mode. There’s no possibility that you will get nice results using auto mode or night preset.
    Another issue is that without a tripod there’s a small chance that your pictures will be sharp. Actually it’s almost impossible. If all the above is not a problem for you, let’s get to the topic.

    Things you will need:

    1. Tripod
    2. Cable release
    3. Camera

    Not necessarily in that order, but all 3 are important. Fast lens will be also useful especially for capturing skies. You can argue that cable release is not that really important. True, but I  still recommend it as it gives you the ability to expose for more than 30 seconds. Releasing the shutter is much more convenient than using camera built-in timers. If you don’t own one, it’s not the end of the world but get one – the simplest one is cheap and will be useful for many other situations too.
    One more thing that is very useful when you are out shooting in the night – flashlight! Or your smartphone – with a cool app should be enough.

    Light pollution

    Shooting Milky Way in the middle of the city is usually a bad idea. Unless the city is abandoned or there’s an electricity outage. Otherwise you will get the light pollution and the only thing you will capture is the light coming from the city, not from the sky. The best places for taking breathtaking night sky pictures are the places far from the cities, far from the civilization. And by far, I mean really far. Even a distant city may create quite big light pollution over the horizon.

    [full_width_image][/full_width_image]

    Moon is not cool

    Moon is cool, when it’s the subject of the photo. When it’s the only subject of the photo. However if you are willing to take a picture of the sky, moon is not cool at all. It’s another light pollution we talked about in the previous paragraph. So basically if you are going to take night pictures of a sky check on the web when the moonrise is, and choose the time when the moon is not visible.

    2012-07-03_moon_horizontal_01

    Photographing the moon is fairly simple. As long as you have a stable tripod and long lens you should be able to capture a nice moon details regardless of the light pollution – moon itself is bright enough. The picture above was shot using 200mm lens + teleconverter 2.0 on APS-C sensor which gives 600mm full frame equivalent. Exposure parameters were ISO 250, f/7.1 1/250s. Always use manual settings, automated modes will give you overexposed images and you will lose all the moon’s details.

    Star trails

    Stars move. Actually according to Copernicus earth is the one which moves. And we can clearly see that movement when we set the shutter open long enough. On the image we will see lines (curves) instead of stars. If this is not what we want to achieve there’s a quick formula which tells us what the longest shutter speed is for a given focal length. What we need to do is to divide 600 by the focal length and the result is the maximum amount of time which will give us sharp stars without any trails.

    600 / 24mm = max 25s
    600 / 15mm = max 40s

    So, the wider you go, the more time you have for a single frame before you start to notice star trails.

    tomasz_cc-20130413-016

    The picture above was exposed for 4-5 minutes, and we can notice very obvious trails.

    Camera settings

    For the best results you should use aperture not bigger than f/4. During the night there’s so little light and you shouldn’t limit it even more with small apertures. You can experiment with ISO, but probably the native value is too low and you will need to crank it up, sometimes even to 3-6k to be able to capture all the light without having star trails. Fast lens and camera with good noise performance on high ISO is the best for that kind of pictures.

    Summary

    Having the last paragraphs in mind, it’s pretty clear, that wide and fast lens is the best for photographing the skies and trying to capture the Milky Way. Wide angle gives us more time and fast lens saves us from using very high ISO.

    The post I want to shoot at night! appeared first on tomasz.cc.

    ]]>
    http://tomasz.cc/2013/04/i-want-to-shoot-at-night/feed/ 6
    Long Exposures Explained http://tomasz.cc/2013/04/long-exposures-explained/ http://tomasz.cc/2013/04/long-exposures-explained/#comments Mon, 01 Apr 2013 10:00:32 +0000 http://tomasz.cc/?p=557 In this article I would like to talk about everything you need to know to take long and very long exposure shots. I will list all the required and recommended equipment, point out common mistakes, show differences between various exposure times and give some helpful tips. Let’s start off with what you really need. Required...

    The post Long Exposures Explained appeared first on tomasz.cc.

    ]]>
    In this article I would like to talk about everything you need to know to take long and very long exposure shots. I will list all the required and recommended equipment, point out common mistakes, show differences between various exposure times and give some helpful tips.

    Let’s start off with what you really need.

    Required equipment

    1. Tripod
    2. Cable release

    To be able to capture a long exposure shot you definitely need a very stable support for your camera. It’s vital, and every even the slightest movement will ruin your photo so it’s very important to have a solid and good quality tripod. In a windy weather you might want to load the tripod with additional weight like backpack.

    Cable release is another required tool which allows you to expand the exposure time beyond the 30 seconds limit. You can say that 30s exposure is long enough, and you will be right, but for me the real fun with long exposures starts way after that time. But if you don’t have a cable release at the moment, you can experiment with shorter times too.

    Recommended equipment

    1. ND filter/filters
    2. Viewfinder cover

    ND filter (ND stands for Neutral Density) is a filter that reduces the amount of light coming to the camera sensor giving no changes in hue of colour rendition. This is theory and unfortunately in reality it’s not really true, because every filter introduces more or less colour cast to your photos. It depends on the length of exposure is and directly from the quality of the filter. Even the most expensive ND filters leave colour cast on the images. For the cheaper filters the colour cast might be very difficult to correct in post-process though. So again, the quality matters. If you don’t have any ND filters right now, remember that increasing the f-stop and lowering the ISO will give you the longest exposure time.

    A viewfinder cover is a very useful tool used to basically cover the viewfinder in order to block any light that might reach the sensor especially when the sun is behind the camera. This little cover can prevent uneven exposure and unwanted artefacts.

    Common mistakes

    1. Autofocus
    2. Vibration reduction
    3. Camera mode

    The first thing I do before I start the long exposure is to make sure I have turned off the autofocus. Long exposures are taken in dark conditions or with a dark filter in front of the lens so in most situations the autofocus sensor is not able to detect the focus properly. When you try to focus just before taking the photo, focusing system will jump in and will not be able to focus correctly. As a result you will end up with a picture which is out of focus.

    Vibration reduction or image stabilisation of your lenses should be turned off anyway for the tripod use. The low amount of light coming to sensor during long exposure will only make things worse, so keep it in mind to check that setting too.

    Another mistake is the use of automated camera mode like aperture priority. In this mode camera will try to calculate exposure time by itself, but again, the amount of light is so low that in many cases this calculation will be wrong, especially for longer exposures. For long exposures the right choice is only manual mode.

    Examples

    The following examples will show you the same scene taken with different settings. The first photo is a regular exposure taken without any filters:

    [full_width_image][/full_width_image]

    The exposure time for this image is 1/4s, ISO 100 and aperture f/16.
    Now what happens if we try to make the exposure a bit longer:

    [full_width_image][/full_width_image]

    This image was taken with the exposure time of 15 seconds (the same ISO and f-stop as the first one). To achieve that I used ND 1.8 filter which basically reduces the light by 6 stops (1/4s, 1/2s, 1s, 2s, 4s, 8s, 15s – 6 stops).

    Now let’s try a really long exposure. For that I used ND 3.0 which is 10 stop filter. The following picture was taken with the exposure of 250s, ISO 100 and f/9:

    [full_width_image][/full_width_image]

    Now, the time used here created this nice effect, the clouds and the sea are really blurred.

    You probably noticed that the aperture for the last shot was changed from f/16 to f/9. It’s because I used a very strong ND filter (10 stops) and I had to compensate with the f-stop so that I wouldn’t end up with the exposure of over 1 hour. Why? Let’s see how to calculate exposure times.

    How to calculate exposure times with ND filter

    Calculating the correct exposure time is a mathematical task. It’s the balance of light that comes to the sensor. The less light goes in, the more time is required to properly expose the image. To be able to calculate the exposure time we need to know how much the shutter time changes for every stop of light. The strength of ND filters is measured in stops, so having a 2 stop ND filter will take 2 stops from our shutter speed.

    Now, step by step:

    1. Put your camera to Aperture priority mode.
    2. Set your ISO and aperture.
    3. Read the shutter speed that camera calculated.

    Let’s say it’s 1/250s. Now we attach the 6 stop ND filter, which means that we need to prolong the shutter speed by 6 stops. To do that let’s use the standardised list of shutter times:

    1/8000 1/4000 1/2000 1/1000 1/500 1/250 1/125 1/60 1/30 1/15 1/8 1/4 1/2 1 2 4 8 15 30 1m 2m 4m etc.

    Take the time that camera calculated (1/250) and move 6 places to the right – 1/4s. That’s the correct shutter time with ND filter attached to the camera and will give the same “brightness” as a picture taken without a filter with 1/250s time.

    There’s an app for that!

    If you have a smartphone you can download apps for the exposure time calculations – Longtime Exposure Calculator for iOS and Exposure Calculator for Android.

    If it doesn’t work

    Now, again this is theory, and in reality this not necessarily might be true. First of all, the quality of ND filters may vary and the 6 stop filter might stop the light a little more or a little less. Another issue is changing light – during an exposure of a few minutes it is possible that the light changes, especially when you take pictures during the sunset or sunrise hours. By the time you finish your eight-minute exposure the sun might not be in the sky anymore and the calculations are no longer right. How to solve that?

    Experiment

    Use the calculations at the beginning to have a general idea of the correct exposure times, but try to play with them. Keep the exposure a bit longer. If the picture is too bright, try again for a shorter amount of time. After some time you will be able to predict more or less the correct shutter time without any tables and calculations.

    The advantage is that with long exposures it’s harder to make a mistake in calculation of shutter speed. If your correct exposure time is 8 minutes and you expose for 7 minutes the picture will be all right. If you expose for 9 minutes – again, the difference will be very small. It always takes a double amount of time to change the exposure by 1 stop. So to make the picture 1 stop brighter you would need to expose it for 16 minutes. That’s quite a difference.

    Hope this article will help you with your long exposures. If so, let me know and send a link to your work!

    The post Long Exposures Explained appeared first on tomasz.cc.

    ]]>
    http://tomasz.cc/2013/04/long-exposures-explained/feed/ 11
    Cinematic productions shot with Nikon D800 http://tomasz.cc/2013/03/cinematic-productions-shot-with-nikon-d800/ http://tomasz.cc/2013/03/cinematic-productions-shot-with-nikon-d800/#comments Sat, 23 Mar 2013 20:35:15 +0000 http://tomasz.cc/?p=438 In this post I would like to show you two cinematic productions shot with Nikon D800 that have impressed me recently. It really proves that Nikon released a very powerful and capable camera with video features. Canon has always been the one shining in the movie industry after the release of 5D M2, but now...

    The post Cinematic productions shot with Nikon D800 appeared first on tomasz.cc.

    ]]>
    In this post I would like to show you two cinematic productions shot with Nikon D800 that have impressed me recently. It really proves that Nikon released a very powerful and capable camera with video features. Canon has always been the one shining in the movie industry after the release of 5D M2, but now Nikon has something in his arsenal which can compete and even deliver much better results due to uncompressed HDMI output.

    Below you can watch two productions entirely shot with the Nikon D800. Of course the amount of gear used to actually shoot these movies is overwhelming for a regular photographer, but the core behind all this is just a camera we all know from the photography world.

    The first movie is “Joy Ride”:

    [ylwm_vimeo width=700 height=394]36305675[/ylwm_vimeo]

    You can also watch the behind the scenes here.

    Another one is called “Broken Night”:

    [ylwm_vimeo width=700 height=394]56862418[/ylwm_vimeo]

    And there is a project’s site with additional footage from behind the scenes, interviews with director etc.

    In both productions you can see very difficult scenes to shoot, low light situations, different lighting conditions, action shots, various angles impossible for traditional cameras – all this shows that Nikon D800 gives absolutely new opportunities in the movie production area and the results that can be achieved with it are stunning.

    Another interesting fact is that the very same camera was used in one of the Dexter episodes (you can see that in the featured picture above this article).

    Featured image found on http://www.definitionmagazine.com/journal/2012/11/22/nikon-dlsrs-in-hollywood.html

    The post Cinematic productions shot with Nikon D800 appeared first on tomasz.cc.

    ]]>
    http://tomasz.cc/2013/03/cinematic-productions-shot-with-nikon-d800/feed/ 0
    Straighten a photo tutorial http://tomasz.cc/2013/02/straighten-a-photo-tutorial/ http://tomasz.cc/2013/02/straighten-a-photo-tutorial/#comments Sun, 24 Feb 2013 10:30:38 +0000 http://tomasz.cc/?p=408 In this video I will show you how to straighten a photo containing quite severe ultra wide angle distortion. For that I will use Lightroom and Photoshop. Some basic adjustments are also applied to improve the picture quality. Hope this tutorial will be useful somebody! Let me know what you think! [ylwm_vimeo width=700 height=394]60362239[/ylwm_vimeo] Straighten...

    The post Straighten a photo tutorial appeared first on tomasz.cc.

    ]]>
    In this video I will show you how to straighten a photo containing quite severe ultra wide angle distortion. For that I will use Lightroom and Photoshop. Some basic adjustments are also applied to improve the picture quality.
    Hope this tutorial will be useful somebody! Let me know what you think!

    [ylwm_vimeo width=700 height=394]60362239[/ylwm_vimeo] Straighten a photo tutorial

    The post Straighten a photo tutorial appeared first on tomasz.cc.

    ]]>
    http://tomasz.cc/2013/02/straighten-a-photo-tutorial/feed/ 4